Panic Attack Symptoms: Am I Having A Panic Attack? – Mental Health – C-health

A sudden fear grips you, and you begin to feel strange physical symptoms and sensations of doom and worry. Is this a panic attack? Sudden, overwhelming fear: That’s panic in a nutshell. You may have felt that kind of sudden, overwhelming fear in terrifying situations – like when you’re forced to slam on the brakes to narrowly miss a car speeding through a red light or when a large dog lunges at you with teeth bared. But a panic attack can happen at moments that have nothing to do with terror – like in the midst of a deep sleep or a dull meeting or while in a class or stuck in traffic or in line at the grocery store. And you don’t have to have a diagnosed panic disorder to experience a panic attack. Panic attacks come on suddenly and unpredictably, and often peak after about 10 to 20 minutes mark. An attack may include several or many of the following symptoms: a sudden feeling of impending doom or death a feeling like you need to escape from where you are a fear of losing control or “going crazy” a feeling of unreality or like you’re detached from yourself rapid heart rate, chest pain, or discomfort sweating, chills, or hot flashes shortness of breath tightness in your throat or trouble swallowing numbness or tingling sensations
Read more at: Panic attack symptoms: Am I having a panic attack? – Mental Health – C-Health

GAD sufferers describe it as a feeling of being wired all of the time. Symptoms of GAD While people who suffer from GAD worry about the same things that other people do relationships, money, heath, work, etc. but they have a much higher level of worry that is nearly constant. The level of concern is not in synch with reality and is greatly magnified. Most people with GAD realize that their concerns are overblown, but they cannot seem to shake their anxiety. The symptoms typically come on slowly, typically between childhood and middle age, but they can occur at any time. In some instances, a major life event, such as a change in heath or a life transition such as a divorce, can trigger the onset of GAD. The symptoms tend to ebb and flow, but can be exacerbated during times of stress. What sets the worry of GAD suffers apart from the normal concerns is that the worry is intrusive, excessive, debilitating and persistent and lasts for more than six months. In terms of behavior, GAD can cause difficulty in concentrating or focusing, and an inability to relax, enjoy quiet time, or to be alone. Fatigue, nausea and headaches are some of the physical symptoms of GAD. Some experience hot flashes, trembling, sweating and frequent urges to go to the bathroom. Sleeplessness is another sign of GAD, because those with the disorder often feel as if they cant stop their mind from racing.
Read more at: Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment | LiveScience

Learn more about common panic attack symptoms . What are the causes and risk factors of panic disorder? A cause of panic disorder has not been conclusively proven, though genetics may affect your risk. Women and those in their 20s or 30s may be at higher risk, but panic disorder can happen to anyone at any age and can come out of nowhere or following a traumatic or stressful life event. How is panic disorder diagnosed? If you’re worried that you might have panic disorder, talk to your doctor about the symptoms you’ve experienced. Since feelings of panic and anxiety can accompany other conditions and illnesses, your doctor will likely perform a thorough examination to rule out other possible causes. You are more likely to be diagnosed with panic disorder if you: have recurrent, sudden panic attacks worry about having more attacks and what will happen if you do change your behaviour and habits because of panic attacks How can panic disorder be treated? Your treatment goal for panic disorder should be to function better on a daily basis and reduce the occurrence of your symptoms. A treatment plan for panic disorder may include cognitive-behavioural therapy, medications, or a combination of therapy and medications.
Full article: Panic disorder – Mental Health – C-Health

14, 2013. The prosecution says he killed her intentionally after an argument. Psychiatrist Dr. Merryll Vorster said events during Pistorius’ life, including the amputation of his lower legs as a baby and his late mother’s habit of sleeping with a gun under her pillow, contributed to his “increasing stress.” “Overall, Mr. Pistorius appears to be a mistrustful and guarded person,” Vorster testified. She said the Olympic athlete displayed “escalating levels of anxiety” through his life when she interviewed him this month. Vorster said she also spoke to members of Pistorius’ family, some of his friends and his agent. Pistorius’ defense said at the outset of its case that it would show his feelings of “vulnerability” and his disability contributed to him shooting Steenkamp. Pistorius is charged with premeditated murder and faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. Vorster’s testimony also dealt with what she said was Pistorius’ fear of crime and how, because he was a double amputee, he reacted to perceived threats in a different way to other people. She noted Pistorius’ mother, who died when he was a teenager, slept with a gun in her bed and also had a fear of being attacked in her home. Cross-examining Vorster at the start of the eighth week of the trial, prosecutor Nel asked if she was saying Pistorius had a mental illness and should undergo a 30-day period of observation, and if he was changing his defense to one of “diminished responsibility.” Nel also asked the psychiatrist if someone who was suffering from an anxiety order of the kind that she had diagnosed in Pistorius, and also had access to guns, would be a danger to society. Vorster said the person would, indeed, be a danger.
For the original article, visit http://www.cbsnews.com/news/oscar-pistorius-anxiety-disorder-defense-psychiatrist-murder-trial/

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