Panic Attack Symptoms: Am I Having A Panic Attack? – Mental Health – C-health

Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety Psychotherapy is a very effective method of treatment for social anxiety disorder. Specifically, cognitive behavioral treatments which include techniques such as exposure therapy, cognitive restructuring without exposure, exposure therapy with cognitive restructuring, and social skills training appear to be highly effective in treatment social anxiety, in a time-limited manner. Most cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can be administered within 16 sessions (usually one session per week). At the end of treatment, a persons anxiety symptoms are greatly reduced or even disappear in some cases. In addition to CBT, other psychological treatments have also been found effective in the treatment of social anxiety. These include cognitive therapy (a form of CBT), social skills training alone, relaxation exercises, exposure therapy alone, behavioral therapy, and some other types of less-practiced forms of psychotherapy. Exposure therapy is often a primary component of psychotherapy treatment of social anxiety disorder. Exposure therapy involves a person learning to understand the irrational basis for their fears (cognitive restructuring), teaching simple relaxation skills to practice while in the moment, and gradually being exposed to the situation which causes the anxiety. The exposure is done first in the safety of the psychotherapy office, imagining the scenario and walking through it with the therapist. As the patients confidence grows, he or she will begin to apply the skills theyve learned in the therapy session to outside world events and environments. Psychotherapy treatments have been shown to be highly effective in treating social anxiety disorder (Acarturk et al., 2009; Powers et al., 2008). Most people who try psychotherapy with a therapist who has experience in treating social anxiety disorder will find relief from their symptoms. Medications for Social Anxiety The primary class of drugs used to treat social anxiety are called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).
View Source: Social Anxiety Disorder Treatment | Psych Central

OK, now imagine that happening while you’re getting ready to do an on-camera interview, or tethered to a live shot, or the very worst — sitting in the anchor chair. It wasn’t just happening to me, it was happening to me in front of millions of people. I have been a journalist a long time. Along the way I have picked up what I consider a nice collection of awards and honors, and reported on everything imaginable: hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, fires, wars, elections, you name it. I am proud of that work, but still feel a huge sense of failure every time I let panic attacks get the best of me. It is hard to describe a panic attack to someone who hasn’t lived through it. As well as an overwhelming sense of dread, a physical weight is on your shoulders — as if something terrible is going to happen. But my colleagues never seemed to know anything was wrong. If I couldn’t concentrate, or felt like I couldn’t get through a live shot I would sometimes say, “Ugh, I don’t feel good. I didn’t sleep well last night.” It was all very believable. Once, I was anchoring a live environment show on CNN on a weekend morning. When I started to read the headlines, I was hyperventilating and couldn’t make a sound. People at home were seeing video of what I was supposed to be talking about.
More: Opinion: Ex-CNN reporter: My struggle with panic attacks – CNN.com

Eyewitnesses say the explosion occurred close to a football viewing centre where fans were gathered to watch the UEFA Champions League match between Spanish giant, Real Madrid and their city rivals, Athletico Madrid. As we earlier reported , the explosionoccurred around Bauchi Roadclose to the University of Jos. According to Premium Times ,the explosion occurred near a car park, few meters away from a security checkpoint. The spokesperson of the Police State Command of the Nigeria Police, Felicia Ali, confirmed the incident but said details were still sketchy. There are reports of casualties but no figure has been officially released. Emergency responders are reportedly on hand to rescue injured victims but reports say this have been hindered due to the fear of more attacks. Residents now live in fear of more attacks as the once peaceful city recently suffered a terrorist attack a week ago around the Jos Terminus market killing about 200 people. We shall bring you updates on the Jos explosion as we get them. You may also like YNaija stories like: Do you think the government is doing enough to rescue the abducted Chibok school girls? Yes
View Source: UPDATE: Panic as explosion hits football viewing centre in Jos |

A sudden fear grips you, and you begin to feel strange physical symptoms and sensations of doom and worry. Is this a panic attack? Sudden, overwhelming fear: That’s panic in a nutshell. You may have felt that kind of sudden, overwhelming fear in terrifying situations – like when you’re forced to slam on the brakes to narrowly miss a car speeding through a red light or when a large dog lunges at you with teeth bared. But a panic attack can happen at moments that have nothing to do with terror – like in the midst of a deep sleep or a dull meeting or while in a class or stuck in traffic or in line at the grocery store. And you don’t have to have a diagnosed panic disorder to experience a panic attack. Panic attacks come on suddenly and unpredictably, and often peak after about 10 to 20 minutes mark. An attack may include several or many of the following symptoms: a sudden feeling of impending doom or death a feeling like you need to escape from where you are a fear of losing control or “going crazy” a feeling of unreality or like you’re detached from yourself rapid heart rate, chest pain, or discomfort sweating, chills, or hot flashes shortness of breath tightness in your throat or trouble swallowing numbness or tingling sensations
Source: Panic attack symptoms: Am I having a panic attack? – Mental Health – C-Health

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s